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NEWS & ASGARDIA

Making the cut.

Ross Cheeseright, Asgardian, Strategist Candidate.

05 September 2017

This article discusses my recent experiences with the press following some publications that I was interviewed for.

This article discusses my recent experiences with the press following some publications that I was interviewed for.

Recently, there have been a couple of publications that have contacted me for my opinions as an active Asgardian and because I’m running for a community leadership position. They’ve all been writing articles about Asgardia, Taxes, diplomacy and our goals.

It struck me just how difficult it must be for them to write a well rounded article and try to make sense of all that information that’s swirling around about Asgardia.

 

Each time that I’ve  been contacted about Asgardia – I’ve provided a very lengthy succinct response to their questions and each time, 99% of what I said has had to be cut.

“II’ve provided a very lengthy succinct response to their questions and each time, 99% of what I said has had to be cut. ”

Due to the issue of space and time (not in the same way that Asgardians think about space and time.) my very succinct answers have been boiled down to ‘soundbites’. Now, I don’t blame the authors for this, but it does make it difficult to have a meaningful narrative on Asgardia.

I will provide an example of the extent that things are getting condensed.

Question:

“The specific issue of the low number of women among Asgardians (15% per cent of the 100,000 who approved the constitution, Lena told me) has come up. Does that bother you personally? Wouldn’t that be a problem if there was a colony in space with only 15% women?”

My answer:

“I think that’s something that can be thought about on multiple levels. Firstly; Asgardia’s goal isn’t specifically to populate space with its own citizens but to make space accessible by all people and to see humanity as a single people in that respect. It aims to make space peaceful and separate it from the conflicts on earth.

“Asgardia is also unique from a philosophical aspect – to serve entire humanity and each and everyone, regardless of his or her personal welfare and the prosperity of the country where they happened to be born.”

(https://asgardia.space/en/word)

I think that the vision that Asgardia is moving to create a utopian society and populate it with its own people so the number of women from this perspective doesn’t specifically apply.

Further to that, I don’t think that it’s unusual to see more interest from men than women in this sort of area. It’s very reminiscent of the STEM — This project is about Science, Engineering, Technology — an area that women, classically at least, are under-represented in.

I think that once the community starts to be more widely accepted as something more than theoretical, the population will start to further diversify.

And when the prospect of actually going to space is on the table, I’m certain that will be of interest to everyone, regardless of their gender.

Add to that the fact that some of our highest-ranking members are females, I can rest secure in the fact that women have strong representation.

To answer your question directly: 15% of 100,000 is 15,000 people, the number of people required to repopulate is 160. 15,000 : 85:000 would provide more than enough bio-diversity to create a successful population. But I don’t think that it will come down to that.”

What was printed:

“As for the worrying dearth of women, he said: “When the prospect of actually going to space is on the table, I’m certain that will be of interest to everyone, regardless of their gender”. In any case, 15 per cent would provide “more than enough biodiversity to create a successful population”

So, you can see here that a large section of my actual response was cut out in order to present a friendly ‘bite’ of my overall point and moreover, most of the questions I answered only served to provide some context, or were cut entirely. Now, that is perhaps part of the ‘art form’ of the author of an article when space is limited.

But it definitely raises the question: What can Asgardia do to control the narrative about the project and help others to understand, with more depth, what Asgardia is about without diluting the message.

About The Author

Ross

Currently, Ross Cheeseright is a member of Asgardia's "Administrative" chapter working on internal communications and new acquisitions and is studying for a degree in Software Engineering. Ross has a passion for nation building and virtual reality and hopes to help solve the problems facing the formation of new 'decentralised micronations' like Asgardia. If you like what Ross is doing and would like to support him, why not consider backing him.

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